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Nb MoDancer
After years of research, several viewings, hours searching the internet and a few visits to Crick narroeboat show. I have finally decided on a new build.
Friday,3 June, 2016
12:27 am
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Enfield
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Hello,

I have finally done it! I have paid my deposit and booked a build slot.

Okay I will not get my boat until the middle of next year, but I do not retire until December so it is not as bad as it sounds. I am really excited with a little fear and in trepidation thrown into the mix.

The basic type size and layout is agreed and contract signed, the next stage will be agreeing the drawings and full specification.

I would like to have my boat for Crick next year but it is unlikely as the provisional date is mid June.

I have gone with Meg A Star narrowboat who were displaying a boat at Crick this year in the marina (last year’s boat was on the arena ). The combination of build quality, personality and price helped me decide to go with this company.

I will keep you informed as we progress to the handover

Andy

Friday,3 June, 2016
7:55 pm
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Enfield
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Let me give you a bit of history to help explain how I arrived at the point I am now.

Back in 2012 I was planning my 30th anniversary celebration when out of the blue my wife asked for a divorce. When your life falls apart and I have never been well off, I started looking for a place to live. The shock of the cost of rented accommodation and an off hand comment about a canal boat sowed the seed. At the time through rose tinted spectacles and promises of a cheap way of life I started looking at boats I could afford, not knowing anything.

After looking at photos on the Internet I found what I thought was the ideal boat, so off I trundled taking my mechanical minded son with me with high hopes of getting my floating home. Lesson one photos lie! After travelling 140 miles to see this super canal boat (at this time I still hadn’t learned the correct name or that there are various types ) I couldn’t hide the disappointment of how tatty the boat was and how much I need to compromise to get afloat. This one boat changed my mind, life on the canal wasn’t for me.

I fell into a new relationship which helped to get me back on my feet and a walk down a towpath reignited the idea. With no immediate rush I had time to research the idea properly and the more I looked the more it appealed to me. Time to book a holiday, one week on the Shropshire Union Canal and I was sold. I am going to retire to the canals. My then girlfriend was not so sure but let me explore the possibility. I think she thought it was a phase.
At this point my only experience was a crusier stern hire boat so my early plans revolved around that style. After a short while semi trad became the preferred type and this remained for a few years even after my discovery day with Paul extolling the virtues of the trad boat, but I had a dog and a semi trad was what I was going to have.

Relationship breakdown gave me more time to think and due to circumstances my dog moved in with my son. Two years on and the liklihood of the dog coming back to me are rapidly diminishing due to her age, thoughts turn to a trad stern for the additional secure storage. Which brings you up to Crick this year (2016). I was going to look, to help finalise my plans so I would be ready to buy a second hand boat in December.

Then I went on the Meg A Star narrowboat and I was blown away by the quality of the build and the honesty and friendliness of the builders, I ordered a build slot for December for a new semi trad. Now it is full steam ahead, just waiting for the contract to be sent through so I can confirm the agreed specifications then roll on December when I retire and pay the first installment. At the moment the expected delivery date is the second week in June 17.

Saturday,4 June, 2016
11:40 pm
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Enfield
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The contract arrived by email today. After reading it carefully, and a phone call to Simon  (the builder)to correct a couple of mistakes, it is all signed. The relevant pages are in the mail to Meg A Star and so begins the long wait.

Simon suggested I consider the font design for the name. I can’t see that filling six months but at least it is a little something for me to do.

Tuesday,7 June, 2016
11:47 am
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Southam, Warwickshire
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Thanks for the story so far Andy. You have some exciting times ahead of you. Have you decided where you are going to go in your new floating home? Are you going to have a mooring, or join the happy band of continuous cruisers?

Click here to get a FREE copy of “Living On A Narrowboat:101 Essential Narrowboat Articles”

Tuesday,7 June, 2016
12:59 pm
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Enfield
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It is my intention to continuous cruise for a few years, possibly wintering on the Lea navigation close to family. 

Possible wedding plans may throw a spanner in the works, but I am hoping that will be also a smooth transition. 

I am thinking the next item is to research the likely availability of winter moorings in my chosen location and factor this into my annual running costs. 

On a side note, I initially thought that I would have a composting toilet fitted from new but after talking to one of the stands at Crick  (who were supposed to be selling them) frightened me into changing my order to a cassette toilet. Your newsletter this weekend painted the opposite picture. Can you bury the solids straight away or do you need to keep it for 6 months? 

Friday,10 June, 2016
6:54 am
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Southam, Warwickshire
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Composting the solids for six months with the limited space available on a narrowboat just isn’t practical. I bury mine immediately. The alternative is to bag and bin it. A couple of heavy duty plastic bags would be more than enough to protect the solid and odour free waste.

Click here to get a FREE copy of “Living On A Narrowboat:101 Essential Narrowboat Articles”

Friday,10 June, 2016
7:08 am
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Enfield
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Thanks Paul, 

That is what I believed from your previous posts on the subject, but when I was told the opposite from the people trying to sell the toilets I got a bit frightened. I want to stay within the law, and to be told that the compost could only be disposed of after 26 weeks and the need to have 3 buckets steered me away. I might phone up and change back to a composting toilet again. For the price of a decent trenching tool it will give me the freedom I initially expected. 

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