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How long should a centre line be
Centre line how long
Friday,23 May, 2014
2:53 pm
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Hi how long should a centre line be for a 57 ft narrowboat so we can hook it round bollard when in a lock. I have been given different lengths from  50 ft to 65 ft ( that’s old money I know ) please don’t reply with how long is a piece of string ??. Thanks in advance

Friday,23 May, 2014
2:56 pm
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Southam, Warwickshire
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Make sure that the rope can reach two or three metres past the back of the boat so you can step off the back of the boat and pull the boat parallel with the bank if you need to.

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Friday,23 May, 2014
2:58 pm
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Mine is 15 metre for a 58 foot boat.

It is said that it should only be long enough to reach the back end but not long enough to go into the water and get wrapped round the prop. But that makes it too short for lots of locks.

Should have said ‘are’ as I have two of them.

Living retirement in the slow lane.

20 years hiring, 6 years of shared ownership and a Continuous Cruiser since 2007 but still learning!

Friday,23 May, 2014
3:09 pm
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pearley said
Mine is 15 metre for a 58 foot boat.

It is said that it should only be long enough to reach the back end but not long enough to go into the water and get wrapped round the prop. But that makes it too short for lots of locks.

Should have said ‘are’ as I have two of them.

…and such a length doesn’t allow you to control the boat if you want to step off the back holding the centre line. The stern line is much more likely to get wrapped around the prop than the centre line, no mater how long it is.

Click here to get a FREE copy of “Living On A Narrowboat:101 Essential Narrowboat Articles”

Friday,23 May, 2014
5:16 pm
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I can’t remember how long mine are (I am not on the boat) but they are much longer than the stern.  It also depends what you are going to do – river cruising requires longer ropes.  Also long ropes enable you to step off at the entrance to the lock with the centre line, going uphill, and you need a fair bit spare to pass over the lock gate.  The boat I shared the Stockton flight with tried to copy me and failed as the centre line was not long enough.

Retired; Somerset/Dorset border when not out and about on Lucy Lowther

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http://thelovelylisanarrowboat.blogspot.co.uk
 
Saturday,24 May, 2014
7:48 am
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Hi There

We changed our single centre rope last year and now have two so one for each side. I worked on 30′ for each side, but (oops) forgot the length needed between the centre point and the cleat on the edge of the boat so I come about 2′ short of the back of the boat. Ours is 57′ as well by the way.

It’s only deeper double locks (8′ is okayish, 10′ are a problem) that we tend to come up short with, but I’ve spliced in loops at the ends and have an additional length of rope that I have to hand and loop through when we’re going into deep locks.

Regards,

Keith

Enjoying the Dream ( Keith & Nicky http://narrowboatboysontour.bl…..gspot.com/ )

Saturday,24 May, 2014
7:57 am
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Southam, Warwickshire
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Another thumb’s up for two centre ropes. I have three 100w solar panels on the roof on the back end of the cabin so my centre line was forever getting caught on them, and the pole and plank when I tried to flick it from one side to the other. Now, with two ropes, there’s no problem at all.

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Saturday,24 May, 2014
11:00 am
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Paul Smith said

pearley said
Mine is 15 metre for a 58 foot boat.

It is said that it should only be long enough to reach the back end but not long enough to go into the water and get wrapped round the prop. But that makes it too short for lots of locks.

Should have said ‘are’ as I have two of them.

…and such a length doesn’t allow you to control the boat if you want to step off the back holding the centre line. The stern line is much more likely to get wrapped around the prop than the centre line, no mater how long it is.

I didn’t mean to imply mine aren’t longer than the boat. They are probably a good 5 metres longer. I don’t like short ropes.

Living retirement in the slow lane.

20 years hiring, 6 years of shared ownership and a Continuous Cruiser since 2007 but still learning!

Tuesday,27 May, 2014
3:16 pm
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I have two centre ropes both are approx. 2ft short of reaching the stern end they have been fine doing locks single handed on river Weaver but not sure about other rivers my concern is my stern & bow ropes which seem to short to me as I prefer to fasten off on board the boat & not the bank where some toerag can untie me whilst asleep instead they have to climb aboard to do there worst at which point the dog will have them Wink

Tuesday,27 May, 2014
3:52 pm
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Norman

Stern lines should be around 10 metres if you want to tie off on the boat and 11 or 12 metres for the bow line. If you are moored and worried about being let loose then try a cable tie around the ropes at one end or the other.

Regards

Pete

Living retirement in the slow lane.

20 years hiring, 6 years of shared ownership and a Continuous Cruiser since 2007 but still learning!

Tuesday,27 May, 2014
3:52 pm
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Sunday,26 January, 2014
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try splicing a bit on the ones you have its not hard nice to know you have a dog that likes raw meat like duke he sits there all nice like he is half asleep then pounces he has had a few back pockets out of jeans little get & one anorak sleeve takes no notice if i am around just watches.

trammanSmile

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