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Fazeley Mill Marina

Fazeley Mill Marina is a delightful spot to moor. Surrounded by mature trees and grass banks, it is an oasis of calm, yet close to a main road and within easy walking distance of many amenities.

Our pontoons provide secure moorings with access to water and metered electricity, while those choosing to tie up bank-side can enjoy a summer’s day relaxing in comfort on the grass under the trees.

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Our popular barbecue area provides a meeting place for everyone to enjoy.

Fazeley Mill Marina

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Diglis Basin Marina

A British Waterways Marina

Diglis Basin is situated in the beautiful city of Worcester. In the centre of England, at the heart of one of the most beautiful parts of the country surrounded by glorious landscapes and charming, historic towns and villages, the city has a rich history of culture, architecture and events of international importance.

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The compact city centre is ideal for strolling, sightseeing and shopping. There is a great mixture of ancient buildings, modern shopping, street cafés and riverside walks guaranteed to reward you with a relaxing and entertaining visit.

The BWML Diglis Basin Worcester office is normally manned between 0900 hrs and 1700 hrs on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. At other times please contact BWML’s Head Office at Sawley Marina on 0115 9077 400 and speak to Rod Grant, Area Manager.

Update: Change of use for 22 moorings from leisure to residential

Diglis Basin Marina

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Devizes Marina

We have over 100 recreational moorings and 7 residential moorings here at Devizes Marina, catering for boats up to 70ft.
The marina is in a peaceful location and the moorings are set in secure landscaped grounds. We are ideally situated at the top of the Caen Hill Flight and on a 14 mile lock-free pound, with a pub and some shops nearby and the market town of Devizes a short drive (or even a walk) away.

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* Electricity and water to each jetty * Electronic gate entry system and secure parking

Devizes Marina

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Crick Marina

Crick Marina is owned and operated by Tim Langer, who began business on the inland waterways in 1992 when he founded Canal Craft Narrowboat Brokerage. Canal Craft started at North Kilworth, but moved to larger premises at Bugbrooke in 1994, and was sold in 1997.

The frequent difficulty of finding moorings for narrow-boat purchasers prompted Tim to seek a suitable site to develop his own marina, and an ideal site was found at Crick.

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The intitial 110-berth basin opened on time in April 1996 and was very soon fully occupied. Three years later an extension of 76 berths was built at the southern end of the basin, which enabled the Crick Boat Show to be held for the first time in 2000.

A further 87-berth extension opened in December 2007, bringing total capacity to over 270 boats.

Day-to-day operation of the marina is in the capable hands of Harbour Masters Gary & Sue Hall.

Crick Marina

Crick Marina

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Crick Marina Review

Written by Jim Shead: First published in Waterways World February 2006.

Crick is a quiet private marina that is normally closed to everyone except moorers and those with business at the marina so it is paradoxical that it is best known as the host for thousands of people during the Crick Boat Show in May each year. Situated on the beautiful twenty mile summit of the Grand Union Canal Leicester Section it provides boaters based there with excellent local cruising and access to a number of routes within a day’s cruising time.

The marina is run by Tim Langer, whose first involvement with the waterways was with Canal Craft narrowboat brokerage, which he founded in 1991. Initially this was at North Kilworth, also on the Leicester Section, then the business temporarily moved to Crick Wharf and finally to Budbrooke Marina on the Grand Union Main Line. In 1997 he sold Canal Craft to its present owner, David Dawson. In 1995 he started work on Crick Marina and it was opened on 1st April 1996, with 120 berths in what is now the north end of the marina. Unfortunately the spoil from digging out this first phase of the marina was deposited on the south end of the site so that three years later when an extension was built there all the soil had to be moved again. When they had some cruisers and shorter craft the marina held up to 195 boats but now with mostly longer boats, including some 70-footers, it holds about 185 boats.

The Crick Boat Show has been a big factor in putting the marina on the map with a wider audience, although the moorings have been over subscribed from virtually day one. The marina on its own does not have the ground area to accommodate the whole show so it is fortunate that the landowner of the site also owns a lot of surrounding land, including the adjoining large flat fields, which provide the site for show exhibitors, car parks and camp sites. This combination of the marina and adjoining land makes the staging of the show possible.

The show moved from Braunston to Crick at short notice in 2000 when it was held there as a one year only event. After that it was extended for the years 2001 – 2005 under a 5 year arrangement. The contract for Crick Marina to provide facilities to British Waterways for the next five years (2006 – 2011) to run the boat show is currently under discussion. British Waterways have plans to expand the content and raise the profile of the show. BW run the whole of the Crick Boat Show except for the clearing of 44 berths for the exhibitors, which is done by Gary and Sue Hall the marina harbourmasters. Boats are moved to temporarily spare jetties and to the spaces between the long jetties that are normally used for access.

At the time the idea for the marina started Tim was running his brokerage business at Crick Wharf and was put in touch with the farmer who owns the site. No significant problems were encountered when he approached the local planning authority about the first phase of the project although there were some problems concerning the spoil disposal regulations for stage two. Now he is looking at the possibility of a further extension to the moorings next year, partly as an extension to the mooring business and partly to provide more space for exhibits at the Crick Boat Show.

The marina has the basic waterside services. The moorings have automatic lighting, mains power and water. There is a building with laundry, toilet, lending library and notice board to serve the boaters based in the marina but no chandlery or shop is provided as it is designed to be a private marina. There is no heavy work done on the site although there is a covered dry dock which is operated by a third party and is available for surveying, hull blacking and minor works. Tim has continued his interest in the boat brokerage business in the marina, with a separate website www.canalboatsales.com, which is run by John and Jane Pugh

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Crick is a quiet private marina that is normally closed to everyone except moorers and those with business at the marina so it is paradoxical that it is best known as the host for thousands of people during the Crick Boat Show in May each year. Situated on the beautiful twenty mile summit of the Grand Union Canal Leicester Section it provides boaters based there with excellent local cruising and access to a number of routes within a day’s cruising time.

The marina is run by Tim Langer, whose first involvement with the waterways was with Canal Craft narrowboat brokerage, which he founded in 1991. Initially this was at North Kilworth, also on the Leicester Section, then the business temporarily moved to Crick Wharf and finally to Budbrooke Marina on the Grand Union Main Line. In 1997 he sold Canal Craft to its present owner, David Dawson. In 1995 he started work on Crick Marina and it was opened on 1st April 1996, with 120 berths in what is now the north end of the marina. Unfortunately the spoil from digging out this first phase of the marina was deposited on the south end of the site so that three years later when an extension was built there all the soil had to be moved again. When they had some cruisers and shorter craft the marina held up to 195 boats but now with mostly longer boats, including some 70-footers, it holds about 185 boats.

A view of the marina

The Crick Boat Show has been a big factor in putting the marina on the map with a wider audience, although the moorings have been over subscribed from virtually day one. The marina on its own does not have the ground area to accommodate the whole show so it is fortunate that the landowner of the site also owns a lot of surrounding land, including the adjoining large flat fields, which provide the site for show exhibitors, car parks and camp sites. This combination of the marina and adjoining land makes the staging of the show possible.

The show moved from Braunston to Crick at short notice in 2000 when it was held there as a one year only event. After that it was extended for the years 2001 – 2005 under a 5 year arrangement. The contract for Crick Marina to provide facilities to British Waterways for the next five years (2006 – 2011) to run the boat show is currently under discussion. British Waterways have plans to expand the content and raise the profile of the show. BW run the whole of the Crick Boat Show except for the clearing of 44 berths for the exhibitors, which is done by Gary and Sue Hall the marina harbourmasters. Boats are moved to temporarily spare jetties and to the spaces between the long jetties that are normally used for access.

Contact:
Crick Marina,
West Haddon Road
Crick
Northamptonshire
NN6 7SQ
Telephone 01788 824034
Email info@crickmarina.com
www.crickmarina.com

At the time the idea for the marina started Tim was running his brokerage business at Crick Wharf and was put in touch with the farmer who owns the site. No significant problems were encountered when he approached the local planning authority about the first phase of the project although there were some problems concerning the spoil disposal regulations for stage two. Now he is looking at the possibility of a further extension to the moorings next year, partly as an extension to the mooring business and partly to provide more space for exhibits at the Crick Boat Show.

The marina has the basic waterside services. The moorings have automatic lighting, mains power and water. There is a building with laundry, toilet, lending library and notice board to serve the boaters based in the marina but no chandlery or shop is provided as it is designed to be a private marina. There is no heavy work done on the site although there is a covered dry dock which is operated by a third party and is available for surveying, hull blacking and minor works. Tim has continued his interest in the boat brokerage business in the marina, with a separate website www.canalboatsales.com, which is run by John and Jane Pugh

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Cowroast Marina

Nestled in the Chilterns, adjacent to the Ashridge estate, on the Tring summit of the Grand Union Canal, you will find Cowroast marina, a family run business, offering secure moorings for around 100 boats, with the benefit of parking your car next to your mooring.

Located at the southern end of the Tring summit adjacent to Cowroast lock, Cowroast Marina is ideally placed for mooring in the South East. Just a few days cruising from London and the Thames to the south and the South Midlands to the north.

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Of Course we offer all of the usual services you would expect, engineering, slipway, narrowboat brokerage, a well stocked chandlery, and, gas, diesel, pump-out and elsan disposal. We also have Wi-Fi internet connection available via BT Openzone.

Cowroast Marina

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Bridgehouse Marina And Caravan Park

Bridgehouse Marina & Caravan Park is situated in the Northwest Lancashire area of England.

Situated ten miles north of Preston, close to the market town of Garstang, Bridgehouse Marina & Caravan Park is conveniently

placed to visit all the Lancashire, South Cumbria and North Yorkshire attractions.

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Our family owned and run site has been trading since1974 and lies between the market town of Garstang and the village of Nateby adjacent to the tranquil Lancaster canal and is easily accessible from junction 32 or 33 of the M6 motorway.

Bridgehouse Marina And Caravan Park

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Braunston Marina

Braunston Marina is ideally located for the canal enthusiast. It lies at the crossroads of the Grand Union and Oxford canals, and indeed of the whole waterways. The opportunities for exploration are near limitless.

The Marina itself is easily located by road lying beside the A45 between Daventry and Rugby. It is only 20 minutes from junction 16 on the M1, under an hour from Birmingham, and two hours from London.

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Braunston Marina is steeped in history. It was originally developed at the turn of the 19th century as the waterways depot at the northern end of what was then called the Grand Junction Canal where it joined up with the Oxford Canal. Several original buildings from the Georgian and early Victorian periods are still in their intended use. The Marina’s entrance is dominated by the very fine Horsley Iron Works cast iron bridge dating from 1834, erected by Thomas Telford.

Today Braunston Marina is a major centre for leisure craft and narrowboats , with modern mooring facilities for 250 boats. a large, busy brokerage selling all types of new and used steel narrowboats. We have dry and wet docks, craneage pad and a service area capable of most repairs.

A number of other boat businesses operate within the marina. We even have a small touring caravan site.

Our event highlight is our annual Historic Boat Rally, held at the end of June, with upwards of 80 old working boats joining the grand parade, many of which are on the national Historic Boat Register. Other attractions include side shows, live music, Morris dancing, trade exhibitors and craft displays, beer tent and even tunnel legging. A great week-end or day out for the whole family.

We at Braunston Marina are committed to providing the finest boating facilities and services available on the waterways to ensure Braunston is THE place for people to enjoy their boating activities.

Braunston Marina

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Blisworth Marina

We are snugly nestled at Gayton Junction on the Grand Union Canal, offering a wealth of cruising options in every direction, making this a popular choice for moorers. We are situated between Northampton and the charming market town of Towcester, adjacent to the A43 and easily accessible from the M1.

We offer water and electric facilities to each berth, modern showers, toilets and laundry. Our helpful residential staff are available seven days a week to help you re-fuel, pump out, give advice on good cruising and assist with any problems. We have plenty of free parking.

Local amenities are close to hand in abundance, from large retail parks to the local village shop, a short walk away.

We have a vibrant and friendly community at our Marina, with regular events taking place.

Our unique Narrowboat Nanny service takes all the hassle and worry out of regular maintenance and preparation, enabling you to spend more time out on the canal enjoying your family, friends and your boat. Visit our Narrowboat Nanny pages to see how we will care for your boat while you are away and have it ready for you when you arrive.

Blisworth Marina

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Blackwater Meadow Marina

Blackwater Meadow Marina is located by the Llangollen Canal on the outskirts of the beautiful market town of Ellesmere in Shropshire which dates back to at least Anglo Saxon times.

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The attractive marina is well equipped with a shop selling boat spares, canal maps, guides and confectionary. On the site there are boats for sale, mooringswith electric hook ups, wi fi and full marina services including a dry dock for out of the water repairs.
The marina is operated by ABC Leisure Group one of the leading companies on the Uk canal network who have another eight marinas strategically placed around the canal network, they have an excellent reputation for building high quality bespoke narrow boats, and can provide everything for the canalboat owner, or potential owner .

Blackwater Meadow Marina

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Blackwater Meadow Marina Review

Blackwater Meadow Marina by Jim Shead (First published in Waterways World in August 2005)

Blackwater Meadow Marina is a comparatively new marina situated close to the junction of the Ellesmere Arm on the busy and ever popular Llangollen Canal. The site was developed in the mid 1990’s by Mick Bridges and his wife Christine who fitted out boats and ran the marina until they sold it on 1st August 2002 to the present owners Waterways Property Portfolio (WPP) Ltd. Jamie Hill is the Managing Director of the marina and is also a director of Canaltime but the day to day operation is in the hands of Neil Huggon, the Marina Manager.

Neil had previously worked as a company director in an engineering distribution company in his home town of Barrow-in-Furness. When Neil started with this company it was associated with the shipyard there, which in 1972 had about 14,500 employees but with the decline of shipbuilding the yard had no more than 5,000 remaining by the time he was made redundant three decades later.

Before he started at the marina in June 2003 Neil’s only previous boating experience was competitive sailing in the Irish Sea. His first trip on a canal was just a week before he started at Blackwater Meadow Marina when his Managing Director arranged a few days trip from Sawley Marina to Burton-on-Trent. This trip, with a friend from his home town, proved an enjoyable introduction to canal boating and Neil was impressed by the tranquillity of the experience and the quality of the boat.

Although close to the centre of Ellesmere the marina is in a quiet rural setting and provides moorings for just under a hundred private boats of all sizes from small cabin cruisers up to 60 foot narrowboats. It is also one of the bases for the ubiquitous Canaltime fleet of timeshare boats. WPP have a management agreement with Canaltime to service and maintain their boats based at the marina. Four days a week from Wednesday to Saturday they clean, service and prepare a proportion of their Canaltime boats ready for new guests to use. Two years ago they had 11 boats, the following year 20 and this year 28 but the size of the marina means that further expansion here is unlikely.

The workforce too has expanded. When Neil took up the post of Marina Manager there were 9 or 10 people on the payroll whereas at present there are about 14 covering all aspects of the marina’s business. Some of these are part-time for the season but the increase in the number of Canaltime boats means that there will be more winter maintenance work to be done and thus the prospect of more jobs continuing throughout the year.

They have three full-time and two part-time engineers to look after the mechanical and electrical work on Canaltime and private boats. They do blacking and small paint jobs but not coach painting or sign-writing work. Pumpout, diesel, gas, chandlery, toilets, Elsan disposal and coal are available. While welcoming everyone to the marina, they do ask that customers first moor outside of the marina to check if these services are available before entering, particularly on the mornings of the Canaltime turnaround days, for safety and operational reasons. As a company they do their best to offer a friendly, reliable, courteous service.

The marina has a slipway for smaller craft and for larger craft the nearby BW dry dock is used for work such as blacking and other tasks that cannot be done in the water. Users of the private moorings have electricity and water available on their pontoons and have a washing machine and tumble dryer available for their use. With the general high demand for moorings and considering the location and setting of Blackwater Meadow Marina it should be no surprise that all the moorings are occupied and the number of people on the waiting list is only slightly less than the total capacity of the marina.

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Bill Fen Marina

Bill Fen Marina is located on the Middle Level Navigations close to the unspoiled market town of Ramsey. The Marina is situated on a beautifully landscaped thirty one acre site amidst open farmland.

Substantial planting of over 2000 trees has created a new wood as part of the Marina site, adding to the beauty of the existing mature trees. A 10 acre extension to the marina grounds is in progress and will provide another beautifully landscaped pond.

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On site surveillance is provided by infrared cctv cameras and for added security, the owners live on site.

The proprietors, John and Lyn Shotbolt, have created an idyllic setting in this tranquil location, come and visit, see for yourself.

Bill Fen Marina

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Bill Fen Marina Review

Written by Jim Shead: First published in Waterways World July 2005

Having a marina in the Middle Level may seem a remote location to most of the inland boating population but John and Lyn Shotbolt have taken remoteness a stage further by establishing their marina at Bill Fen on Ramsey High Lode. It is 7? miles from the so called “through route” used by craft crossing the Middle Level navigations between the rivers Nene and Great Ouse.

Nearly 150 boats now have places in the marina and others are on the waiting list for moorings. The Middle Level is one of the few places where boats do not require a licence to cruise (although this is likely to change within the next few years) and that is one factor in the increasing demand for moorings in the area. There are also a large number of people living in East Anglia that want to cruise the waterway system but would like to keep their boats near home. Nor is that the whole story as a closer look at the marina will reveal.

In about 1947 John Shotbolt’s father and grandfather started an engineering business in Ramsey doing agricultural work and acting as sub-contractors to large local engineering companies. John continued the business and was living in a house by the Old Nene river at Ramsey St. Mary’s when he decided he would like a boat, so he built himself first a small flat bottomed boat and then a narrowboat.

He then got requests from people to build narrowboats for them and by the time he stopped boat building in 1997 he had completed 60 craft. Having bought a boat many people were then asking where can we moor? This prompted John and Lyn to look for a suitable site for a marina in the Ramsey area.

Their first idea was to use a plot of land near their home village of Ramsey St. Mary’s but this was turned down. In response to their enquiries the planners suggested that an acceptable place to build a marina would be somewhere down the Ramsey High Lode, that runs from the Old Nene to the town. Some land in this area came up for sale by tender and they were able to buy the site.

In 1991 the site was just a flat field with no trees, shrubs or water features. An application for planning permission was made and granted and the first stage of the marina, providing moorings for about 30 boats, was dug out in 1992. Two further stages of development followed with an extra plot being bought to complete the last stage which provides moorings for between 140 and 150 boats.

The small size of the original moorings was because at this time John was constructing boats at a site in Ramsey and the Bill Fen moorings were just a sideline. Now they have ended narrowboat building and the marina is the main activity of the business. Lyn does all the administration and paperwork while John concentrates on maintaining the site which has a large area of grass and shrubs.
John Shotbolt.

The usual diesel, water, gas, coal, pumpout, toilet and showers are available and there is a small chandlery that can supply boater’s needs either from stock or by ordering in. It has no formal opening hours as it is mainly a service for moorers. There is a slipway that will take boats of up to 60 foot. DIY boat blacking and painting can be done but there is no covered boat painting area.

The marina is also a Caravan Club Certified Location with five plots located in a sheltered position beside a large pond that has been created as one of the many landscape features on the site. Fishing is good in the marina and attracts a few local anglers.

Once a year the marina hosts an event for the local IWA branch which usually takes the form of a boule and barbecue day but which this year also includes a May Bank Holiday weekend gathering for moorers and visitors. This is just another factor that contributes to the friendly and welcoming feel of this marina in a rural setting close to the small town of Ramsey.

Once out of the marina there are miles of quiet fenland waters with few locks that recapture the solitude and peaceful cruising that are now just a memory on many of our waterways.

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