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Clean drinking water tank
Sunday,21 April, 2013
3:46 pm
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Wednesday,29 August, 2012
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Hi,

 

I am shortly taking delivery of a boat which has been ignored for the last couple of years. I will obviously drain and re-fill the water tank a number of times, but does anyone know of a good method of cleaning it, perhaps by the addition of a chemical? I wondered if a bottle of Milton would be enough?

It was suggested I paint it internally How? With what?

 

Also, I thought I would get an in-line water filter. I have seen the GEE 'Nature Pure' system, but it is quite pricey at a couple of hundred. Any ideas?

 

Thanks

 

Kelvin

Sunday,21 April, 2013
10:23 pm
Where the mood takes me, from the south coast to the canals of England/Wales
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Wednesday,5 December, 2012
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Hi, there are tablets available that when added to the water system and sterilize the system.

Also I read somewhere that adding a good dose of thin bleach to the water, pump it throughout the water system leave for 24 hours. Then thoroughly flush the system several times until all smell of bleach has gone will also work.

I prefer the tablets myself, any good chandlery should have them.

Monday,22 April, 2013
5:59 am
Southam, Warwickshire
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The tablets that Graham's talking about if your water tank is a stainless steel or plastic insert. If your water tank is integral - part of the boat's structure - you've need to do more than drop some tablets in. If you have an integral tank, there's a chance that you have rust inside it. You'll need to drain the tank, allow it to dry, scrape all the rust off and give it a protective coat with something like bitumen. If the tank is under the well deck, there should be an access hatch bolted to the deck. It's quite a tight space to get into. It's not a favourite job here at Calcutt.

Monday,22 April, 2013
4:07 pm
Poole, Dorset, UK
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Saturday,2 March, 2013
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Paul Smith said
If your water tank is integral - part of the boat's structure - you've need to do more than drop some tablets in. If you have an integral tank, there's a chance that you have rust inside it. You'll need to drain the tank, allow it to dry, scrape all the rust off and give it a protective coat with something like bitumen. If the tank is under the well deck, there should be an access hatch bolted to the deck. It's quite a tight space to get into. It's not a favourite job here at Calcutt.

Hi Paul,

Is this something that a survey would pick up, or does it fall under the buyer beware section?

I suppose the other questions should be, is it common and can you line it or put another tank inside it instead?

Cheers,

Blakie Smile

Poole, Dorset ... not a canal in sight, but I'm not going to be here for long ... Anupadin
Tuesday,23 April, 2013
7:47 am
Southam, Warwickshire
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You can run all the taps inside the boat when you go to view it. If the water is brown you have an indication that all may not be well in the water tank. The surveyor won't have access to the inside of the tank. He may include an assessment of what he can see. Here's a sample surveyor's report.

http://www.northernstarmarine......sample.pdf

Integral water tanks will need regular maintenance so if you don't like the idea of periodically climbing into your tank to prepare and then paint it, go for a stainless or plastic water tank. I know that you can have inserts fitted for integral water tanks but I don't know how easy they are to fit.

Tuesday,23 April, 2013
9:51 am
Poole, Dorset, UK
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Paul Smith said
Here's a sample surveyor's report.

http://www.northernstarmarine......sample.pdf

Maybe I'm easily deterred, but a report like that would result in a smart about turn in my case. Am I being too optimistic, or should I expect to see overplating recommendations and the like?

Cheers,

Blakie Smile

Poole, Dorset ... not a canal in sight, but I'm not going to be here for long ... Anupadin
Tuesday,23 April, 2013
10:32 am
Southam, Warwickshire
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Maybe I shouldn't have used that report as an example. I wouldn't want to buy it either. I suppose the results of the survey will depend to a certain extent on the size of your budget. Please note that this particular boat was 34 years old and didn't appear to have been maintained very well. I suspect you wouldn't have been interested enough in this boat to have a survey done in the first place.

Tuesday,23 April, 2013
9:01 pm
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Thanks all.

I don't know yet what sort of tank I have. If it is integral, maybe a collapsible tank could be fiddled inside it?

 

Wednesday,24 April, 2013
9:05 am
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Monday,8 April, 2013
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Hi all,

I know the survey report has to have to have been on a poor condition boat and all - but if that is the typical standard of a surveyor's report then I reckon it is a case of SELLER beware your sins will find you out.

If all surveyors are not this good then I would want this one to survey any second boat I was looking at.

 

Thanks for posting it Paul.

Wednesday,24 April, 2013
9:39 am
Poole, Dorset, UK
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Saturday,2 March, 2013
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Hi Folks,

Bearing in mind that buying a boat may well be the second most expensive purchase of your life, after a house, I think the more help you can get when deciding on which vessel to buy, the better.

RCR offer an engine inspection service, which given that the engine of your prospective purchase is a goodly percentage of the overall cost, might be the best £70 you ever spend.

More details here.

Cheers,

Blakie Smile

Poole, Dorset ... not a canal in sight, but I'm not going to be here for long ... Anupadin
Tuesday,4 June, 2013
11:26 am
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Saturday,1 June, 2013
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I know this thread is a few months old but on the topic of domestic water supplies on boats can I emphasize the importance of NOT using domestic bleach products as a method of cleaning/sterilizing your  water supply.

I read and replied on another forum on this same topic and cannot stress how important it is to use the correct food safe products. There are numerous perfectly suitable products ( like milton as suggested earlier) that if used correctly offer cost effective and more importantly safe cleaning/sterilization of potable water.  I work in the food industry at a school and the local EHO along with the school have strict rules on what I can use in the food preparation environment, Bleach is high on the list of chemicals not allowed in our kitchen whatever its intended use, it is considered a poison risk.

We are allowed to use appropriate products that are considered safe for food preparation areas and those designed for use in sterilizing salad items.

As for how any chlorine based product would react with ferrous metal I am not able to offer any help in this area other than use great caution,

Fittings, seals, pumps etc could be affected, I am sure other forum members could offer better information than I could.

Steve 

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